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How to Tie a Tie

The top four tie knots everyone should know.

Whether it’s your first time tying a tie or you’re just looking for a helpful refresh, these step-by-step
videos and guides will teach you the basics of (what we think are) the most important tie knots.

How to Tie a Windsor Knot

The Windsor Knot

A Windsor Knot, or “Full Windsor,” is a classic tie knot—and one of the most popular. It’s fuller and more symmetrical than others, so tying the Windsor takes practice. In terms of when to wear it, this knot is worn for formal and semi-formal occasions because of its pristine, elegant appearance. Plus, it pairs best with wide spread-collar shirts, which are suited to dressier events.

The Windsor Knot The Windsor Knot

1. Place the wide end on your left and the narrow end on your right.

2. Cross the wide end over the narrow end.

3. Pass the wide end up through the neck loop.

4. Take the wide end down and to the right.

5. Bring the wide end under and to the left.

6. Take the wide end and bring it up and through the neck loop.

7. Cross over the loop to your right to form the knot.

8. Bring it up through the neck loop from below.

9. Pull it through the loosened knot.

10. Tighten and adjust the dimple.

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How to Tie a Half Windsor Knot

The Half Windsor Knot

This particular knot is suitable for almost all occasions—which is why it’s one of the most popular. Since it is smaller in size, it can be worn with more collars—such as the button-down, forward point or spread collar. It is appropriate for work and weddings—most semi-formal occasions, in fact. Learning how to tie a Half Windsor is relatively easy, too.

The Half Windsor Knot The Half Windsor Knot

1. Place the wide end on your left and the narrow end on your right.

2. Cross the wide end over the narrow end.

3. Pass the wide end under the narrow end.

4. Bring up and through the loop.

5. Take the wide end down and to the right.

6. Bring the wide end up to the center and wrap around to form a knot.

7. Pass the wide end through the loop and bring it down.

8. Pull the pointed end up and then down through the knot.

9. Tighten and adjust the dimple.

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How to Tie a Four-in-Hand Knot

The Four-in-Hand Knot

Easy to tie and super versatile, the Four-in-Hand knot is a slightly asymmetrical tie knot. Since it is adaptable to most occasions (except the most formal), it pairs well with casual collars—especially the button-down and forward point. It’s the one most men learn to tie first and therefore the most popular.

Four-in-Hand Knot Four-in-Hand Knot

1. Lay the wide end on your left and narrow end on your right.

2. Cross left over right.

3. Bring the wide end under and back to the left.

4. Take the wide end back over once more.

5. Pull the wide end up through neck loop.

6. Bring it down through front loop.

7. Tighten the knot and adjust the dimple.

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About the Dimple

Perfecting the dimple in your tie knot takes practice, but the confidence that comes from a masterfully-tied tie is worth the effort. To achieve the perfect dimple, pinch the tie with your thumb and middle finger, then use your index finger to keep the dimple in place as you tighten.

Final Thoughts

The thing to remember most when learning your tie knots is patience. Invariably, it will take several attempts before you feel like a pro. Our advice: You will likely tend to favor one tie knot—but consider branching out and learning all three so you can mix up the look. Reserve a Windsor for your special events, and consider the Four-in-Hand best for everyday occasions. In choosing these three tie knots, we’ve covered all the bases. Another thing to remember is that certain knots pair well with the shape of your face. For instance, rounder faces are best served by the smaller Four-in-Hand knot, while slimmer faces are suited to larger knots, such as the Windsor or Half Windsor.

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